Are You Up-to-Date on Your Vaccines?

Are You Up-to-Date on Your Vaccines?

For many parents, back-to-school time means school physicals and immunizations, but it’s a great time for adults to schedule an annual well check, too.

Shots aren’t just for kids. Adults need four key immunizations as they grow older to help maintain optimal health.

The annual flu vaccine protects against influenza for that year’s anticipated virus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends everyone six months and older get vaccinated annually. The best time to receive your flu vaccine is in the early fall, before flu season hits its peak.

Pneumococcal vaccines protect people from pneumonia. The CDC recommends adults age 65 and older receive the vaccine once. Adults with certain chronic conditions may need the vaccine at a younger age.

The tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis (Tdap) vaccination protects against whooping cough, tetanus and diphtheria. Whooping cough is an infection that leads to intense coughing and is especially dangerous for infants. Adults most commonly spread whooping cough to infants, making it important for pregnant women, parents, grandparents and other child caretakers to receive the pertussis booster shot as recommended. The CDC recommends adults receive this one-time booster after the age of 19. Pregnant women in their third trimester also need to get the vaccine, regardless of their vaccination history.

The tetanus-diphtheria (Td) booster shot helps protect against these two severe bacterial infections. If you’ve already received the Tdap vaccine, you can receive the Td booster every 10 years.

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